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Found An Injured Animal?

Whats Wrong?
(click one option below)







Found a Sick or Injured Animal

- Record exactly where you found the injured animal. In almost all cases if the animal is rehabilitated and deemed fit for release it will be released as close to possible as to where it was found. This massively increases its chance of survival.

- Where possible and when safe to do so confine the animal and stay with it keeping it quiet and warm. Do not attempt to pick up bats, kangaroos, wallabies, or koala; they have strong kicks and sharp claws which may be dangerous. If feasible, use gloves, towels, blankets, or clothes to assist in catching and managing the animal while also protecting yourself from bites and scratches. Reduce stress by arranging a swift catch (e.g. by throwing a jumper or towel over the animal), limiting handling, and confining the animal in a dark, quiet room with good ventilation. If the animal is too badly hurt do not attempt to move it unless it is in a dangerous place such as a busy road.

- Do not feed the animal until a caregiver can examine the situation and determine what therapy is required.

- Call a professional for help
Contact Michelle on (03) 9503 9872 or 0411600591
You can also contact your local 24 hour vet. Please note staff are not permitted to leave surgery but they are happy to provide assistance to injured wildlife.

Remember that the animal is wild and may feel intimidated or stressed as a result of your approach. Always put your safety first and remember the best way to help an injured animal is to call for professional help.








Found an Orphaned or Junvenile Animal

Ensure the parents are not nearby. For many species, birds in particular, it's natural for the young to be on the ground to forage and develop skills needed later in life. The mother is usually nearby, watching or getting food.

A juvenile animal may need help if:
- they are visibly injured
- they do not have any feathers or fur
- their parents are dead nearby

- Where possible and when safe to do so confine the animal and stay with it keeping it quiet and warm. Do not attempt to pick up bats, kangaroos, wallabies, or koala; they have strong kicks and sharp claws which may be dangerous. If feasible, use gloves, towels, blankets, or clothes to assist assist in catching and managing the animal while also protecting yourself from bites and scratches. Reduce stress by arranging a swift catch (e.g. by throwing a jumper or towel over the animal), limiting handling, and confining the animal in a dark, quiet room with good ventilation. If the animal is too badly hurt do not attempt to move it unless it is in a dangerous place such as a busy road.

- Do not feed the animal until a caregiver can examine the situation and determine what therapy is required.

- Call a professional for help
Contact Michelle on (03) 9503 9872 or 0411600591
You can also contact your local 24 hour vet. Please note staff are not permitted to leave surgery but they are happy to provide assistance to injured wildlife.

Remember that the animal is wild and may feel intimidated or stressed as a result of your approach. Always put your safety first and remember the best way to help an injured animal is to call for professional help.










Found an Animal That has been Attacked

- Animal bites and scratches can cause serious infections. It's important to inform the caregiver that the wildlife has been bitten by another animal.

- Approach an injured animal carefully, fear and pain can induce aggressive and unpredictable behaviour.

- Record exactly where you found the injured animal. In almost all cases if the animal is rehabilitated and deemed fit for release it will be released as close to possible as to where it was found. This massively increases its chance of survival.

- Where possible and when safe to do so confine the animal and stay with it, keeping it quiet and warm. Do not attempt to pick up bats, kangaroos, wallabies, or koala; they have strong kicks and sharp claws which may be dangerous. If feasible, use gloves, towels, blankets, or clothes to assist assist in catching and managing the animal while also protecting yourself from bites and scratches. Reduce stress by arranging a swift catch (e.g. by throwing a jumper or towel over the animal), limiting handling, and confining the animal in a dark, quiet room with good ventilation. If the animal is too badly hurt do not attempt to move it unless it is in a dangerous place such as a busy road.

- Do not feed the animal until a caregiver can examine the situation and determine what therapy is required.

- Call a professional for help
Contact Michelle on (03) 9503 9872 or 0411600591
You can also contact your local 24 hour vet. Please note staff are not permitted to leave surgery but they are happy to provide assistance to injured wildlife.

Remember that the animal is wild and may feel intimidated or stressed as a result of your approach. Always put your safety first and remember the best way to help an injured animal is to call for professional help.










Found a Burnt or Fire Affected Animal

Wildlife injured by a bushfire should be reported to the bushfire Incident Control Center or to the DELWP Customer Contact Centre on 136 186.

For individual animals that have been affected by a domestic fire:

- Approach an injured animal carefully, fear and pain can induce aggressive and unpredictable behaviour.

- Record exactly where you found the injured animal. In almost all cases if the animal is rehabilitated and deemed fit for release it will be released as close to possible as to where it was found. This massively increases its chance of survival.

- Where possible and when safe to do so confine the animal and stay with it keeping it quiet and warm. Do not attempt to pick up bats, kangaroos, wallabies, or koala; they have strong kicks and sharp claws which may be dangerous. If feasible, use gloves, towels, blankets, or clothes to assist assist in catching and managing the animal while also protecting yourself from bites and scratches. Reduce stress by arranging a swift catch (e.g. by throwing a jumper or towel over the animal), limiting handling, and confining the animal in a dark, quiet room with good ventilation. If the animal is too badly hurt do not attempt to move it unless it is in a dangerous place such as a busy road.

-Do not feed the animal until a caregiver can examine the situation and determine what therapy is required.


- Call a professional for help
Contact Michelle on (03) 9503 9872 or 0411600591
You can also contact your local 24 hour vet. Please note staff are not permitted to leave surgery but they are happy to provide assistance to injured wildlife.

Remember that the animal is wild and may feel intimidated or stressed as a result of your approach. Always put your safety first and remember the best way to help an injured animal is to call for professional help.









Found a Heat Stressed Animal

You can help wildlife that is suffering from heat stress by providing shade and water bowls. Spray mist into trees and shrubs to help create a cooler niche.

If the animal is un-responsive:

- Approach an injured animal carefully, fear and pain can induce aggressive and unpredictable behaviour.

- Record exactly where you found the injured animal. In almost all cases if the animal is rehabilitated and deemed fit for release it will be released as close to possible as to where it was found. This massively increases its chance of survival.

- Where possible and when safe to do so confine the animal and stay with it keeping it quiet and warm. Do not attempt to pick up bats, kangaroos, wallabies, or koala; they have strong kicks and sharp claws which may be dangerous. If feasible, use gloves, towels, blankets, or clothes to assist assist in catching and managing the animal while also protecting yourself from bites and scratches. Reduce stress by arranging a swift catch (e.g. by throwing a jumper or towel over the animal), limiting handling, and confining the animal in a dark, quiet room with good ventilation. If the animal is too badly hurt do not attempt to move it unless it is in a dangerous place such as a busy road.

- Do not feed the animal until a caregiver can examine the situation and determine what therapy is required.

- Call a professional for help Contact Michelle on (03) 9503 9872 or 0411600591
You can also contact your local 24 hour vet. Please note staff are not permitted to leave surgery but they are happy to provide assistance to injured wildlife.

Remember that the animal is wild and may feel intimidated or stressed as a result of your approach. Always put your safety first and remember the best way to help an injured animal is to call for professional help.









Caught or Tangled

- Animals caught in nets or otherwise entangled will be highly distressed and need to be carefully untangled by someone with experience. Try to throw a blanket, towel or other material over the animal to calm it down.
- Record exactly where you found the injured animal. In almost all cases if the animal is rehabilitated and deemed fit for release it will be released as close to possible as to where it was found. This massively increases its chance of survival.


- Do not feed the animal until a caregiver can examine the situation and determine what therapy is required.

- Call a professional for help
Contact Michelle on (03) 9503 9872 or 0411600591
You can also contact your local 24 hour vet. Please note staff are not permitted to leave surgery but they are happy to provide assistance to injured wildlife.

Remember that the animal is wild and may feel intimidated or stressed as a result of your approach. Always put your safety first and remember the best way to help an injured animal is to call for professional help.